Minnesota Book Awards

Exciting announcement #1: The Wizard of Suomen is officially nominated for a Minnesota Book Award!

The initial round of judging happens over the winter, and four books from each category are announced at the end of January (“genre fiction” for me). I have my fingers crossed that TWoS will at least make it that far! Winners for each category are announced in April.

I probably won’t have many updates about this until January, but will be sure to post anything that comes up. 😀

~Ethelinda

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Now that I’ve made it look a little prettier, I’ll just let everyone know that you can like my Page on Facebook over here, if you are so inclined.

Also, I’m over on Goodreads for those who prefer that.

A couple exciting announcements coming soon!

~Ethelinda

“Practical Magic”

It is always exciting to discover that an author you like has written more books than you realized! This is apparently true of Joan Aiken, who wrote The Wolves of Willoughby Chase, one of my favorite children’s stories that I still re-read from time to time.

A friend shared this article about Aiken on Facebook today, which taught me many things that I didn’t know. For example, I did not realize that The Wolves of Willoughby Chase (and the other books in that series) is set in an alternate history for England. As the author of the article describes, the book is certainly full of all kinds of tropes, but Aiken uses them with such obvious delight, and is such a good story-teller, that I can’t say I ever really noticed them.

I think I’ll start by looking up the other books in The Wolves Chronicles, and then try some of Aiken’s other work as well. It all sounds wonderfully imaginative!

~Ethelinda

;_;

I’m extremely sad to learn that Victor Milán passed away earlier this year. I was deeply enjoying his latest series, The Dinosaur Lords, and it’s heartbreaking to know that he had planned at least three more novels, as well as short stories/novellas/etc. in that universe, but didn’t get the chance to finish them. Cancer sucks. If you are a dinosaur and fantasy fan and haven’t read the existing three books yet, do it anyway – they are worth it.

RIP, Mr. Milán, and I wish you a dinosaur-filled Paradise.

~Ethelinda

Review: The Greenland Diaries by Patrick W. Marsh

(“A book that scares you” from the Reading Challenge)

This is a review for the first two books of this series, Days 1-100 and Days 101-140.

These were gripping books! Horror is not my usual genre, but I happened to meet the author at a local convention last year, and this story sounded intriguing. It sucked me in right away; in spite of having told myself I wouldn’t read it in the evenings, I did, and ended up finishing the first book in just a few days. Similarly, I read the second book in just a few days as well. They are difficult to put down! I live in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota, and I think that it makes a story like this more real, and more terrifying, to have it set in an area that you know well, because then you can’t help but picture what is happening to these familiar places, and feel sympathetic to what the main character is going through.

The premise was very different than anything I have read before, and therefore quite interesting. The main character, a bank teller, manages to survive a terrifying night at his bank when strange drums signal the arrival of monsters which kill anyone they encounter out in the open. Being careful and observant, he makes it home, and continues to evade the monsters that appear every night, even as strange green plants begin to slowly grow over everything. The story does a good job of capturing both the hair-raising periods of terror and the in-between tedium that the main character experiences. Both volumes leave off on quite a cliff-hanger, so I’m looking forward to reading the third book. I don’t know how many books the author intends, but it will be satisfying whenever the characters finally learn what has happened to their world and why! I’ll do an update when I’ve read more.

I would recommend this to anyone who likes horror, and particularly horror with a fantasy/fantastical twist to it, or someone who isn’t picky about genre but enjoys stories set in Minnesota.

Review: The Orc of Many Questions by Shane Michael Murray

(“A book with nonhuman characters” from the Reading Challenge)

I got this book specifically because it seemed like it would have an unorthodox take on orcs, and I was not disappointed.

The story follows a young orc (a “blunc”) who unusually has a fairly sharp mind and a very inquisitive nature; not attributes that are looked on favorably in his tribe. Large, powerful orcs who can be successful in raids against the humans, elves, and dwarves of the world are the ideal, this being the only way that the orcs can procure food, weapons, goods, and “entertainment.” Talking-Wind wants to know why his people are stuck in this life of constant raiding, and even has some hints that life was not always like this for orcs, but he has more questions than answers, and little time to search for them. Talking-Wind’s curiosity draws unwanted attention not only from the other young orcs, who are all too happy to bully someone smaller and weaker, but also from the dragon that demands regular tribute from the orc clan. When the dragon comes for him, Talking-Wind needs all his wits in order to have a hope of surviving long enough to get all of his many questions answered!

This book was a lot grosser than I was expecting, which perhaps should not have surprised me given the subject of the story; there is some gore, but mainly a lot of unpleasant bodily functions! This does not detract from the story, but might be something to be aware of.

It also does a good job with starting to break down the standard fantasy trope of “orcs are evil because they are evil,” which has bothered me more and more in recent years. A certain well-known fantasy series that shall not be named recently doubled-down on this, after spending several books/years looking like they too might be reversing or at least questioning the trope, which annoyed me. Partly for that reason, I’ve been looking for stories that do better and don’t automatically go the route of saying that some races are actually evil by nature. To me, that makes for much less interesting villains/enemies. Easier to kill with a clean conscience, perhaps, but not much else.

There is a sequel which I have not gotten to yet, but do hope to read soon! I would recommend this one to anyone who is interested in a subversion of typical fantasy tropes, anyone who likes a very down-to-earth-complete-with-bodily-fluids type of story, or anyone who happens to be interested in orcs as a fantasy race.